You are here

A conversation with my son on place value

This is an excerpt from a conversation I had with my son while we were walking from the subway to the theatre.

My son: Daddy, let's play a number game.
Me: Okay. What's seven billion, nine hundred and ninety-nine million, nine hundred and ninety-nine plus one?
My son: That's too big Daddy, I can't add those!!
Me: Okay, let's try a simpler problem. What's nine plus one?
Son: Ten.
Me: Ninety-nine plus one?
Son: One hundred.
Me: Nine hundred and ninety-nine plus one?
Son: One thousand.
Me: Nine thousand, nine hundred and ninety-nine plus one?
Son: I don't know how to say the next number. Oh wait! TEN thousand (proudly).
Me: Ninety-nine thousand, nine hundred and ninety-nine plus one?
Son: One hundred thousand.
Me: Nine hundred and ninety-nine thousand, nine hundred and ninety-nine plus one?
Son: How do you say one thousand thousands?
Me: One million.
Son (laughs): Okay the last one is one million.
Me (continuing): What's nine million, nine hundred and ninety-nine thousand, nine hundred and ninety-nineplus one?
Son: Ten million.
Me: What's ninety-nine million, nine hundred and ninety-nine thousand, nine hundred and ninety-nine plus one?
Son: One hundred million.
Me: Nine hundred and ninety-nine million, nine hundred and ninety-nine thousand, nine hundred and ninety-nine plus one?
Son: How do you say one thousand millions?
Me: One billion.
Son: That's the answer then, one billion.
Me: Okay, now try the first problem. What's seven billion, nine hundred and ninety-nine million, nine hundred and ninety-nine thousand, nine hundred and ninety-nine plus one?
Son (no hesitation): Eight billion.
Son: What's one thousand billions?
Me: One trillion.
Son: What's one thousand trillions?
Me: One quadrillion.
Son (giggles): And then?
Me: Quintillion
Son: What's next!
Me: Sextillions, then Septillions, then Octillions, then Nonillions, then probably Decillions.
Son: What's next?
Me: Probably Endecillions1 and Dodecillions1, but that's the limit of my Greek.
Me: What if we played our adding game forever?
Son: Infinity! But we'd have to play in Heaven because even if we played until the end of our lives, we still wouldn't reach infinity.
(Leads to a long discussion on whether heaven exists and where we go when we die.)

This kind of conversation, between my son and I, is typical as we have a lot of conversations about numbers. In this case, I presented him with a challenging problem, and he was not able to do it. I then used George Pólya's "trick" of asking my son simpler problems which led up to him seeing how to solve the more complicated problem. Does this mean that my son understands place value, or even all the numbers he was able to say? Probably not, our conversation was entirely linguistic, but it's a start.

 

1.Here is a list of the names of the large numbers. Notice that my two guesses are actually wrong (but close!).

 

 

About David

David is a Formative Assessment Specialist for Mathematics at New Visions for Public Schools in NYC. He has been teaching since 2002, and has worked in Brooklyn, London, Bangkok, and Vancouver before moving back to the United States. He has his Masters degree in Educational Technology from UBC, and is the co-author of a mathematics textbook. He has been published in ISTE's Leading and Learning, Educational Technology Solutions, The Software Developers Journal, The Bangkok Post and Edutopia. He blogs with the Cooperative Catalyst, and is the Assessment group facilitator for Edutopia. He has also helped organize the first Edcamp in Canada, and TEDxKIDS@BC.

Comments

Awesome.  I love it!!

I love it too! But Polya's approach is not a trick, it is often the only way forward.
And another BUT - I am not convinced that this is about place value. What about 8+1,  98+1, 998+1 etc

How glorious!  I was homeschooled as a child, and had many similar conversations with my parents.  The other night I was spending time with a friend's seven year old, and she was telling me about when the pilgrims came here (something she's studying in second grade).  I asked her how long ago that was.  She wasn't quite sure, and said, well, less than a million years ago.  We ended up using a pretty similar strategy to what you describe to build up to big subtraction.  Thanks for sharing!

Add new comment

Subscribe via email

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
EEILSWPEECRGUIT
Enter the word shown above.

Links

Subscribe Subscribe to my blog

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer