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The Reflective Educator

Mistake-making to sense-making

Here are my slides and my notes from my five minute Pecha Kucha-style presentation at Educon. The focus of my presentation was on my journey as someone who started his teaching as viewing students as mistake makers to being a teacher who views students as sense-makers.

Academic Language in the Math Classroom

Here, go and read through this task from Illustrative Mathematics. I'll wait for you. Pay attention to the use of academic language in the task.

 

Here are the academic vocabulary words I noticed students would need to understand (in an academic sense) in order to be able to do this task without any support:

Formative Assessment: More than just an exit ticket

As part of homeschooling my son, I recently started teaching a mathematics class to a group of 8 to 10 year olds on Saturday. In this class, I decided to use the TERC investigations curriculum. After reading through the curriculum overview, I decided that the major focus of the first unit of each year is about helping students preview the mathematics to be learned for the year and investigating as a teacher what students currently understand. 

I have just three words of advice

I have just three words of advice. Study your teaching.

You can't control where your students come from, and you can't control what their parents do, and you can't control how society views them, and while all of these things are important, you can only pick a part of the problems you see and start working. Every dirty floor that gets cleaned starts with a single sweep of the broom.

Study your teaching.

What did I write about in 2014?

In 2014, I only wrote 50 blog posts (3 are still unpublished) as compared to 2013 when I wrote about 180 posts. I wrote a lot less this past year in the previous year, at least on this blog. Is this a sign that I have less to write about? Or is this a sign that I just have less time to write? I tend toward the latter explanation, given how much work it is to keep up with my two-year-old son...

Teaching Mathematical Language

The Problem

Imagine you have a list of possible questions you want students to be able to understand and be able to translate into mathematical symbols, like the following.

Self-directed Workshops

I'm facilitating a pair of workshops this weekend in San Francisco, both of which are fairly self-directed workshops. In fact, it occurred to me that a motivated person or small group could probably get a lot of out of what I have constructed without my direct support. So I'm embedding them below. Feel free to use/share these resources (for non-commercial purposes). In each presentation, there is a link to the folder that holds the agenda for the workshop, and that agenda contains a link to the folder of associated resources.

What do mathematics teachers need to know?

I've been thinking a lot recently about what knowledge is needed by mathematics teachers in order to be excellent teachers. It is clear to me that teachers of mathematics must know the mathematics they are to teach, but what else do they need to know?

Different types of knowledge

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